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Hands Only CPR

Hands Only CPR

All victims of cardiac arrest should receive, at a minimum, high-quality chest compressions (ie, chest compressions of adequate rate and depth with minimal interruptions). To support that goal and save more lives, the AHA ECC Committee recommends the following. When an adult suddenly collapses, trained or untrained bystanders should—at a minimum—activate their community emergency medical response system (eg, call 999 or 112) and provide high-quality chest compressions by pushing hard and fast in the center of the chest, minimizing interruptions (Class I).

  • If a bystander is not trained in CPR, then the bystander should provide hands-only CPR (Class IIa). The rescuer should continue hands-only CPR until an automated external defibrillator arrives and is ready for use or EMS providers take over care of the victim.
  • If a bystander was previously trained in CPR and is confident in his or her ability to provide rescue breaths with minimal interruptions in chest compressions, then the bystander should provide either conventional CPR using a 30:2 compression-to-ventilation ratio (Class IIa) or hands only CPR (Class IIa). The rescuer should continue CPR until an automated external defibrillator arrives and is ready for use or EMS providers take over care of the victim.
  • If the bystander was previously trained in CPR but is not confident in his or her ability to provide conventional CPR including high-quality chest compressions (ie, compressions of adequate rate and depth with minimal interruptions) with rescue breaths, then the bystander should give hands-only CPR (Class IIa). The rescuer should continue hands-only CPR until an automated external defibrillator arrives and is ready for use or EMS providers take over the care of the victim.

 

Some of the Facts

  • Adequate oxygen exists within the blood during at least the first 10 mins of cardiac arrest.
  • Even a totally occluded airway during the first 6 mins of cardiac arrest does not compromise survival if reasonable circulation is provided with chest compressions. 
  • Telephone dispatcher-guided BLS cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has likewise shown no survival disadvantage to chest compression-only CPR when compared with telephone-guided standard BLS CPR.
  • Manikin "exit testing" at course completion has revealed significant advantages of the simplified approach compared with standard CPR courses for the lay public.

 

Campaign Videos

Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Council 

This campaign was awarded: 

  • Irish Healthcare Awards 2010
  • International Visual Communication Association (IVCA) Clarion Awards 2010
  • Public Service Announcement (PSA) Award 2010

American Heart Association 

British Heart Foundation

 

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Full article as published in Resuscitation Journal:

Circulation-2008-Sayre-2162-7.pdf

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